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Sounds of Spring!

Toads and frogs are vocal. Each species of toad and frog has a specific call that is used to attract a mate and, in some species, defend territories. Males call by moving air back and forth over the vocal cords between the mouth and lungs. The vocal pouch is used to resonate the calls.

All toads and frogs in West Virginia mate and deposit eggs in water, including sluggish streams, permanent ponds, temporary ponds, roadside ditches and road puddles. Typically, males arrive at the breeding sites first and start calling. Tadpoles generally eat aquatic plants such as algae but some species will eat animal matter. Transformation of tadpoles to subadults involves the appearance of hind legs followed by the development of front legs and lungs. During this developmental process, the tail becomes smaller. Newly transformed frogs are called froglets, and newly transformed toads are called toadlets.

Click on the graphics below to listen to sounds (in RealAudio format*) of West Virginia frogs!
Audio clips are courtesy of Marshall University Herpetology Laboratory (www.marshall.edu/herp)

American Toad
American Toad  
 
Green Frog
Green Frog
 
Blanchard's Crickett Frog
Blanchard's Crickett Frog
 
Northern Leopard Frog
Northern Leopard Frog
 
Fowler's Toad
Fowler's Toad
 
Spring Peeper
Spring Peeper
 
Gray Tree Frog
Gray Tree Frog
Wood Frog
Wood Frog

 

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